Tag Archives: science fiction

Linda Nagata’s The Red: First Light

Having found some writers I enjoyed in Gardener Dozois’ The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Thirty-fifth Annual Collection from 2018, I’ve dutifully set about reading some long-form fiction by a few of them. First up is Linda Nagata, whose novel The … Continue reading

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C. L. Moore’s Judgment Night

Believe it or not, science fiction and fantasy used to be dominated by men. (They also used to be a lot more fluid than they are now – the genres, not the men.) Of the major writers in the area … Continue reading

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Gardener Dozois’ The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Thirty-fifth Annual Collection

Short-form science fiction is pretty much my idea of perfect summer reading. I want something to dip into that will hold my interest at least briefly on a languid afternoon, so a big ol’ volume of great SF is just … Continue reading

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An interview with Gardner Dozois

This interview was conducted by Jayme Lynn Blaschke and edited for this publication by Cat Eldridge. Gardner Dozois began editing Asimov’s Science Fiction in May of 1985, and since then has established himself as one of the foremost editors in … Continue reading

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Paul Cornell’s Rosebud

Paul Cornell’s Rosebud is an interesting little novella from an expert creator. While the title certainly brings to mind either horticulture or the works of Orson Welles, this volume is instead very much of the post-post-transhuman society. The basic plot features … Continue reading

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Lavie Tidhar’s Neom

Lavie Tidhar’s Neom is a stunning return to his world of Central Station, intertwining the fates of humans and robots at a futuristic city on the edge of the Red Sea.  There has been a town at the place called … Continue reading

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Neal Stephenson’s Termination Shock

This book is the first post-Covid novel I’ve read, although there have probably been some others written by now. But given that it was published barely 18 months into the pandemic, and the time it takes to write, edit, and … Continue reading

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Kim Stanley Robinson’s New York 2140

So I’m going about this backward. I’ve already read and reviewed Kim Stanley Robinson’s 2020 speculative fiction tome The Ministry for the Future, in which likeable and powerful people grapple with the climate crisis in the near future. Now I’m … Continue reading

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Ursula K. Le Guin’s Worlds of Exile and Illusion

Ursula K. Le Guin’s Worlds of Exile and Illusion collects the three earliest published novels by the author. Specifically the first three Hainish novels (Rocannon’s World, Planet of Exile, City of Illusions) are contained with the pages of the large … Continue reading

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Deborah Grabien’s Still Life with Devils

Christopher White penned this review. Deborah Grabien is a writer with a style that is easy and pleasant to read; in short, she is a talented storyteller. Still Life with Devils is a potentially interesting genre mash-up, mystery meets supernatural. … Continue reading

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