Category Archives: Commentary

What’s New for the 27th of November: sf, mysteries, and an sf mystery; Finnish light jazz and tango, plus music of a leftover nature; autumnal gardening, Oysters with June Tabor; and rhubarb wine?

Sometimes, she reflected, she dressed for courage, sometimes for success, and sometimes for the consolation of knowing that whatever else went wrong, at least she liked her clothes. — Eddi in Emma Bull’s War for the Oaks We’ve got our first snow here … Continue reading

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What’s New for the 13th of November: SF from G. Willow Wilson, R F Kuang, Emery Robin, Everina Maxwell, Larry Niven, and some detective fiction; Persepolis; Vonnegut-inspired jazz, English and Welsh folk music, Balkan music; truly bad candy; some Tolkieniana, and more

Every book tells a different story to the person who reads it. How they perceive that book will depend on who they are. A good book reflects the reader, as much as it illuminates the author’s text. — Charles de Lint’s The … Continue reading

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What’s New for the 30th of October: Spooks galore! Stephen King, Ellen Datlow, William Gibson; Halloween on screen; bad Dracula; Singing Bones, Metallica on cellos, scary chocolates and more

Tom Skelton shivered. Anyone could see that the wind was a special wind this night, and the darkness took on a special feel because it was All Hallows’ Eve. Everything seemed cut from soft black velvet or gold or orange … Continue reading

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What’s New for the 16th of October: Fantasy maps, Bradbury mysteries, Middle Earth history; Cajun music on film; comfort foods; Daredevil; classical music reviews, and more

The soldier came knocking upon the queen’s door He said, “I am not fighting for you any more” And the queen knew she’d seen his face someplace before And slowly she let him inside Suzanne Vega’s ‘The Queen and the … Continue reading

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What’s New for the 2nd of October: Contradance music and Arabian fuzz, William Gipson redux, military SF and horror, soul cake, and more

The most complex programs in existence are used for consumer analysis. They’re everywhere, watching and analyzing every aspect of our lives. The amount of data gathered on any one of us is mind-boggling. ― Linda Nagata’s The Red: First Light Care … Continue reading

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What’s New for the 18th of September: Our Elizabeth Bear edition, plus some de Lint on film and in comics, contemporary raga, lots of traditional fiddle music and a Bert Jansch tribute, and of course dragons and chocolate.

Was this what having an identity felt like? Was this being someone? Feeling like there was a core of who you were beyond which you could not be altered? Feeling . . . continuity. Feeling like you existed as a real, solid thing, … Continue reading

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What’s New for the 4th of September: A Rivers of London novella, a Piece of Pulp gets the Film Treatment,Ice Cream, Jethro Tull’s ‘The Hunting Girl’

Crop handle carved in bone; sat high upon a throne of finest English leather. The queen of all the pack, this joker raised his hat and talked about the weather. All should be warned about this high born Hunting Girl. … Continue reading

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What’s New for the 21st of August: Summer Queen SJ ‘Sooj’ Tucker including her performing ‘Ravens in the Library’, Swedish folk music, Matt Wagner’s Grendel and a wee bit more.

One flies in to case the joint,  boldly struts around. Two fly in to make it three,  laugh a while and knock each other down. Four flies in with a frowning walk  gains a laugh from out a squawk but … Continue reading

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What’s New for the 7th of August: lots of SF books and audiobooks; Euro-folk, Indian classical, and some jazz, plus lots of African music; jerky; Jonah Hex; and more!

It is a man’s face, with oak laves growing from the mouth and ears, and completely encircling the head. Mr. Griffith suggested that it was intended to symbolize the spirit of inspiration, but it seemed to me certain that it … Continue reading

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An interview with Gardner Dozois

This interview was conducted by Jayme Lynn Blaschke and edited for this publication by Cat Eldridge. Gardner Dozois began editing Asimov’s Science Fiction in May of 1985, and since then has established himself as one of the foremost editors in … Continue reading

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